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  #11  
Old 06-22-2022, 06:36 PM
Cadmandu Cadmandu is offline
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That sounds to easy. I live on 5 hilley acres
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  #12  
Old 06-23-2022, 05:53 AM
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Yes, that will make a difference if you have a bunch of hills.

I just changed a pump on my 2072 and did not have to remove the engine tins, just the small removable piece above it.

I have used this pump on my 3205 and it works pretty good.
https://www.autozone.com/fuel-system...42s/732036_0_0

Here is probably the best way to go. The video in post #6 is probably what I will try the next time I do one.
https://www.onlycubcadets.net/forum/...ighlight=facet
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  #13  
Old 06-23-2022, 06:06 AM
Cadmandu Cadmandu is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Farmall450 View Post
Meh.

I normally end up "rebuilding" the old one with pieces of the new b/c the bent arm that rides the cam and actuates never seems quite right on the new ones. At least my experience w/ KT17 Series II and M18.
Can you rebuild it while still installed in the mower
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  #14  
Old 06-23-2022, 06:57 AM
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I faced the same dilemma on the M18 in my 1810 recently. You are correct the easiest way to access the bolts holding on the fuel pump is to remove the engine tin. That's near impossible with the engine in the frame.

I removed the small piece of engine tin that surrounds the fuel pump (I'm guessing you already took that off). The next thing I did was shove some shop towels down the hole around the fuel pump so anything you drop will not disappear into the abyss and end up getting throw around by the flywheel fan. I took a philips head bit from my bit driver set and a 6 point 1/4" drive socket that fit the drive end of the philips bit. Put the 1/4" socket on my 1/4" drive ratchet and was able to fish that into position. One had held the bit into the bolt head and one hand worked the ratchet. It takes some time cause you can only turn the ratchet a small amount at a time.

I tried to get fancy on the reassembly and replace the philips head bolts with hex head bolts but the bolt heads are positioned too close the fuel pump body to allow clearance for a hex bolt socket. I ended up reusing the philips head bolts and reassembling the using the "tool" described above.

Good luck. Remember there is nothing holding the bit into the socket so if you tilt it too far the bit will slide out of the socket when you are getting it into or out of position - that's why the shop rags are critical.
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  #15  
Old 06-23-2022, 07:10 AM
Cadmandu Cadmandu is offline
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Thanks that is great info. Is the sheet metal that you removed on top? The side piece is not removable.
Can you just saw out a window in the side piece.
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  #16  
Old 06-23-2022, 04:58 PM
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Yes the top piece is all I removed. I personally would not mess with the side piece that covers the head for fear it would affect the cooling air flow coming from the fan shroud to the cylinder head. But thats just me.
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  #17  
Old 06-23-2022, 05:36 PM
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The fuel pumps can be removed on the M-18/M-20's by removing the small access cover.
I have done it multiple times, just be a bit careful as mentioned.
No need to go hacking an access hole in the cooling shrouds.
The newer plastic pumps use a rubber sealing ring instead of a gasket making it easier to replace without gluing a paper gasket to the pump.
Do read the instruction paper provided with the new fuel pump, as they are not tightened as tight as the metal pumps are using a paper gasket.
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  #18  
Old 06-23-2022, 05:55 PM
Cadmandu Cadmandu is offline
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Ok thanks
The shut off for the tank will be here Monday
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  #19  
Old 06-23-2022, 08:55 PM
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Did you order a new tank bung too? Some come with them but some don't.
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  #20  
Old 06-24-2022, 04:27 AM
Cadmandu Cadmandu is offline
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I got a shutoff valve with a ss filter and new grommet
Plus I'm buying 5 gal of non ethanol
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