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  #11  
Old 06-20-2019, 12:46 PM
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ironman ironman is offline
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Everyone's opinions are welcome, and that one to me, sounds very plausible. (sounds like Mythbusters)
By the way, apologies to Rmowl for hijacking his thread.
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  #12  
Old 06-20-2019, 12:57 PM
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ol'George ol'George is offline
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ok if it was a solenoid, and you removed the plunger it would overheat the coil and it would fail.
Or an induction electric motor, if you lock the rotor the amps go way up and presto, magic smoke from the field windings
If one varies the load on the motor, the amps vary accordingly.
Now back to the pto,
I ran a quick test with a pto coil, an old tractor amp meter laying on the bench,and a couple of jumper wires.
The amp meter showed an increase of about an amp or so, with the driven disc removed from the drive disk.
Now the accuracy of the old tractor amp meter and it's sensitivity are not the best, but it does prove that the amp draw increases when the air gap increases.
I'm sure if I set up a video camera and figured how to up load it the forum, one would see that with power applied, and as the driven disc is mover closer the amp draw would decrease.
hope this helps explain what is happening.
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  #13  
Old 06-20-2019, 02:32 PM
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Well, I can't dispute what an honorable man says he seen with his own eyes so your word is good enough for me. However, is a one amp difference enough to melt a fuse holder and wires?
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  #14  
Old 06-20-2019, 03:10 PM
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I will jump on this tonight. Side note I did see a big increase in the amp meter unlike before with this new issue. I’ll adjust and report back. Appreciate the feedback and informative discussion
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  #15  
Old 06-20-2019, 03:21 PM
finsruskw finsruskw is offline
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Probably was a lot of resistance in the fuse holder and connections if they repeatedly got wet, as a lot of this equipment does.
One can spot them sitting out where they ran out of gas or otherwise had issues in yards all over the country.
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  #16  
Old 06-20-2019, 04:11 PM
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I think we are getting ac theory and DC theory intermixed. Th DC current does not change as the inductance changes. I ran a test to prove it to myself. The coil measured 2.8 ohms on my Fluke 179, drew 4.5A with a battery voltage of 12.56. No matter how I moved things, the current remained the same.
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  #17  
Old 06-20-2019, 04:31 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironman View Post
Well, I can't dispute what an honorable man says he seen with his own eyes so your word is good enough for me. However, is a one amp difference enough to melt a fuse holder and wires?
That is a good question and a lot of variables.
Was the fuse holder corroded, causing high resistance?
------it does cause ignition switch plug issues.
Was the pto coil really drawing excessive current? and was it caused from a larger gap than necessary?
If i had a pto coil I was willing to sacrifice, I'd power it at about 14V as that is approx. running volts, with a
large enough gap to cause it to not function.
Then see if it causes the coil to fail.
All that said, lets hope the gap adjustment cures the op's problem,
and the extra draw was just from a corrosion/high resistance problem in the
fuse holder area.
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  #18  
Old 06-20-2019, 04:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RLause View Post
I think we are getting ac theory and DC theory intermixed. Th DC current does not change as the inductance changes. I ran a test to prove it to myself. The coil measured 2.8 ohms on my Fluke 179, drew 4.5A with a battery voltage of 12.56. No matter how I moved things, the current remained the same.
Now that is interesting as I saw an amp draw decrease when I placed the plate on the coil (Driver) several times.
I didn't try to remove the plate as it was difficult because of the attraction of the energized electromagnet.
( I had the brake plate removed so I could easily do the test)
I was using a fully charged battery.
I'll have to check my otc meter, but I don't think I can go very high on amp draw reading.
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  #19  
Old 06-20-2019, 07:28 PM
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The gaps were way out. Got them to .010. Here’s a picture of the amp meter before adjustment with lights on (LED) and PTO on. Bottom picture is with gaps adjusted, lights and PTO on, wide open. Thanks for the help all!
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 299C438E-92EE-4DC7-8FF7-8C71B33B82FB.jpg (28.8 KB, 27 views)
File Type: jpg 8630A96D-8681-46FA-9DB8-04BBC4323C07.jpg (15.4 KB, 27 views)
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  #20  
Old 06-20-2019, 08:13 PM
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Well the proof is in the pictures, so hopefiully we all (except for ol'George ) learned something here.
Just out of curiosity. Rmowl, when you say the air gap "was way off", what did you measure? I don't know how big it can get but I would have thought they would have mentioned it in the adjustment procedure just because of an issue like this.
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