Only Cub Cadets

PLEASE PATRONIZE OUR SPONSORS!

CC Speciaalties R. F. Houtz and Sons

Patton Acres IH Cub Cadet Parts

Cub Cadet Parts & Service


If you would like to help maintain this site & enhance it, feel free to donate whatever amount you would like to!



OCC Archives


Go Back   Only Cub Cadets > Cub Cadets > IH Cub Cadet Tractors (GT)

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 11-21-2020, 03:37 PM
mrjeep81's Avatar
mrjeep81 mrjeep81 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Ohio
Posts: 345
Default Hour Meter

I've just completed rebuilding the engine in my sisters 1250. The hour meter was not turning so I figured before I replace it I may as well see what "makes it tick". Or in this case, what kept it from ticking.
I took some pics so anybody interested in trying to fix one might jump in. I also reset the needles to "0" for the fresh engine, you can see in the one pic they merely press on the shaft with spring tension.

*pic 1 shows the small pick i used to pull the flange back/open on the face ring. (it's quite soft and was east to do)
*pic 2 shows the ring removed
*pic 3 is obviously the inside, in my case it just need a light blast of air to clean it out. (sorry i cant say any of your meters will be repaired as easily )
*pic 4 shows the needle removed, it simply pulls straight off the shaft with a little tug.
*pic 5 shows i used a flat drift pin to simply "roll" the edges back closed around the circumference of the gauge when finished inside.
*pic 6 is the finished piece. you can easily see it was done, but not when placed back in the dash.
*and finally pic 8 shows the "new" zeroed hour meter ready for another 45 years of service!
and last but not least, the tractor proper.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg hour4.jpg (25.6 KB, 72 views)
File Type: jpg hour8.jpg (17.4 KB, 68 views)
File Type: jpg hour 1.jpg (17.0 KB, 69 views)
File Type: jpg hour2.jpg (16.7 KB, 68 views)
File Type: jpg hour5.jpg (25.0 KB, 69 views)
File Type: jpg hour6.jpg (20.8 KB, 69 views)
File Type: jpg hour7.jpg (19.6 KB, 68 views)
File Type: jpg 1250.jpg (20.7 KB, 66 views)
File Type: jpg 12502.jpg (33.3 KB, 68 views)
__________________
1450SGT
1641
528 SWE Snowblower,
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 11-21-2020, 07:41 PM
ironman's Avatar
ironman ironman is online now
Grand Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,269
Default

In the days before everything became electronic in automobiles, the dashboard clocks operated by passing power through a set of contact points inside the clock to a relay arm that would kick back and simultaneously open the contact points and wind the clocks spring to make it run. As the clock ran the spring would gradually wind down and the relay arm would slowly move back to hthe position where the contact points would close and the whole thing would repeat, and the clock kept ticking. Usually when the clocks quit working it was because the contact points had become pitted, just like the ones in your engine.

I have not had one of these hour meters apart but being of the same era I assumed they operate the same way. When you had it open, did you see anything such as I have described?
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 11-21-2020, 07:45 PM
finsruskw finsruskw is online now
Grand Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Iowa
Posts: 2,030
Default

You can hear the clock spring wind when you first turn the key.
That is if your ears are still any good like mine aren't!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 11-21-2020, 08:02 PM
RLause's Avatar
RLause RLause is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Toledo, Ohio
Posts: 501
Default

I found that the old lube in the bearings would get stiff and keep the gears from turning. A spray of tv tuner cleaner would usually fix the problem.
__________________
Richard

1979 IH Cub Cadet 782 w/CH20, dual hydraulics, power steering and Cat 0 three point
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 11-21-2020, 08:04 PM
Billy-O's Avatar
Billy-O Billy-O is online now
Grand Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,375
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ironman View Post
In the days before everything became electronic in automobiles, the dashboard clocks operated by passing power through a set of contact points inside the clock to a relay arm that would kick back and simultaneously open the contact points and wind the clocks spring to make it run. As the clock ran the spring would gradually wind down and the relay arm would slowly move back to hthe position where the contact points would close and the whole thing would repeat, and the clock kept ticking. Usually when the clocks quit working it was because the contact points had become pitted, just like the ones in your engine.

I have not had one of these hour meters apart but being of the same era I assumed they operate the same way. When you had it open, did you see anything such as I have described?
In this case for a meter that measures time for a machine in use, wouldn't it have to have something to stop the clock when the machine is NOT is use?
__________________
Two 125's and a 124 all with 42" decks
Plow blade
#2 Cart
QA36 snowthower
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 11-21-2020, 08:20 PM
finsruskw finsruskw is online now
Grand Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Iowa
Posts: 2,030
Default

It's right there in your hand when you start the tractor.....
The ignition key!!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 11-21-2020, 08:38 PM
ol'George's Avatar
ol'George ol'George is offline
Grand Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: MI
Posts: 5,505
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Billy-O View Post
In this case for a meter that measures time for a machine in use, wouldn't it have to have something to stop the clock when the machine is NOT is use?
The spring is small and the hour meter only runs a minute or so in each
electro magnetic wind impulse.
When you turn the key off it continues to run maybe half a minute.
While the car clocks used a longer spring.
IIRR they ran about 3 minutes between impulses.
They were not a coiled spring like a 8 day clock or a rope starter spring
they are about the size of a ball point pen spring, like a mini screen door spring.
Still remember hearing the clock "click/rewind" when sitting in my '56 chevy,
Now I'd be lucky to hear the engine running.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 11-21-2020, 08:50 PM
RLause's Avatar
RLause RLause is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Toledo, Ohio
Posts: 501
Default

George, I had a 54 Olds 98, 2 door hardtop.
__________________
Richard

1979 IH Cub Cadet 782 w/CH20, dual hydraulics, power steering and Cat 0 three point
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 11-21-2020, 09:25 PM
ol'George's Avatar
ol'George ol'George is offline
Grand Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: MI
Posts: 5,505
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ol'George View Post
The spring is small and the hour meter only runs a minute or so in each
electro magnetic wind impulse.
When you turn the key off it continues to run maybe half a minute.
While the car clocks used a longer spring.
IIRR they ran about 3 minutes between impulses.
They were not a coiled spring like a 8 day clock or a rope starter spring
they are about the size of a ball point pen spring, like a mini screen door spring.
Still remember hearing the clock "click/rewind" when sitting in my '56 chevy,
Now I'd be lucky to hear the engine running.
Quote:
Originally Posted by RLause View Post
George, I had a 54 Olds 98, 2 door hardtop.
Between Dad & I we had:
DAD:
'28, '32,'40, '50 '56 HT..'58 post,'63 HT,
Me:
'54 HT. '55 post '57 conv., '60 ElCamino, '64ss.
Then I got married and quit counting.
I still have Dads '63 Impala HT.
Other collectables also
yes, all Bowties
Opps, off topic AGAIN
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 11-21-2020, 10:03 PM
Billy-O's Avatar
Billy-O Billy-O is online now
Grand Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 1,375
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ol'George View Post
The spring is small and the hour meter only runs a minute or so in each
electro magnetic wind impulse.
When you turn the key off it continues to run maybe half a minute.
While the car clocks used a longer spring.
IIRR they ran about 3 minutes between impulses.
They were not a coiled spring like a 8 day clock or a rope starter spring
they are about the size of a ball point pen spring, like a mini screen door spring.
Still remember hearing the clock "click/rewind" when sitting in my '56 chevy,
Now I'd be lucky to hear the engine running.
That make sense,... Thank you!
__________________
Two 125's and a 124 all with 42" decks
Plow blade
#2 Cart
QA36 snowthower
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:22 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Cub Cadet is a premium line of outdoor power equipment, established in 1961 as part of International Harvester. During the 1960s, IH initiated an entirely new line of lawn and garden equipment aimed at the owners rural homes with large yards and private gardens. There were a wide variety of Cub Cadet branded and after-market attachments available; including mowers, blades, snow blowers, front loaders, plows, carts, etc. Cub Cadet advertising at that time harped on their thorough testing by "boys - acknowledged by many as the world's worst destructive force!". Cub Cadets became known for their dependability and rugged construction.

MTD Products, Inc. of Cleveland, Ohio purchased the Cub Cadet brand from International Harvester in 1981. Cub Cadet was held as a wholly owned subsidiary for many years following this acquisition, which allowed them to operate independently. Recently, MTD has taken a more aggressive role and integrated Cub Cadet into its other lines of power equipment.

This website and forum are not affiliated with or sponsored by MTD Products Inc, which owns the CUB CADET trademarks. It is not an official MTD Products Inc, website, and MTD Products Inc, is not responsible for any of its content. The official MTD Products Inc, website can be found at: http://www.mtdproducts.com. The information and opinions expressed on this website are the responsibility of the website's owner and/or it's members, & do not represent the opinions of MTD Products Inc. IH®, INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER® are registered trademark of CNH America LLC

All material, images, and graphics from this site are the property of www.onlycubcadets.net. Any unauthorized use, reproductions, or duplications are prohibited unless solely expressed in writing.

Cub Cadet, Cub, Cadet, IH, MTD, Parts, Tractors, Tractor, International Harvester, Lawn, Garden, Lawn Mower, Kohler, garden tractor equipment, lawn garden tractors, antique garden tractors, garden tractor, PTO, parts, online, Original, 70, 71, 72, 73, 76, SO76, 80, 81, 86, 100, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108,109, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 147, 149, 169, 182, 282, 382, 482, 580, 582, 582 Special, 680, 682, 782, 782D, 784, 800, 805, 882, 982, 984, 986, 1000, 1015, 1100, 1105, 1110, 1200, 1250, 1282, 1450, 1512, 1604, 1605, 1606, 1610, 1615, 1620, 1650, 1710, 1711, 1712, 1806, 1810, 1811, 1812, 1912, 1914.