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  #1  
Old 10-12-2021, 12:38 PM
Professor Professor is offline
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Default Teaser Spring "Spacer" info?

Some of the pulling clutch vendors sell a teaser Spring spacer which looks very much like an aluminum pilot bushing.
I THINK this is supposed to REPLACEMENT the teaser Spring (and not ne used WITH the teaser spring). This is for a mowing tractor, not a "race" tractor. (Model 126)
The reason I ask is the teaser Spring seems to be a weak link....I would love to eliminate the teaser Spring if possible. Anybody know anything about them?
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  #2  
Old 10-12-2021, 03:43 PM
finsruskw finsruskw is online now
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It gets used with the spring.
The spring sits inside of it, and eliminated the spring end proper, from wearing on the rear clutch plate.
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Old 10-12-2021, 04:09 PM
Merk Merk is offline
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The best thing for your 126 is use what they use from the factory when it comes to teaser spring. I use the teaser spring from IH and don't have any problems.
Here are a few changes I do:
I like to use a stiffer clutch spring something in the neighborhood 450 to 500 pound rated spring.
I like to use clutch disc made out Kevlar. The warmer they get the better the gripe.
I use a driveshaft made out of 4140 material. I like to use 2 split collars instead of drilling a hole to hold the spring in place.
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Old 10-12-2021, 09:11 PM
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Thanks for both responses and the help. Here's what I THINK I found out:
There are two different types of spacers made. One is like a collar, the spring does indeed fit inside it. I would think that it helps keep the spring from distorting laterally. (The Colt .45 recoil spring design has been improved this way on later models)
The second type of spacer is what I have. It is solid....looks like an aluminum pilot bushing , slides on the shaft and the O.D. matches the O.D. of the teaser Spring, and the length is approximately the same as well. I do believe that REPLACES the teaser spring....at least, that's the way I assembled it. I left the teaser Spring out. Clutch works like a charm.
The whole reason I did this is that the tesser spring broke and then would bind up the clutch and prevent it from disengaging SOME times. ((Drove me crazy figuring it out). When I watched some videos on YouTube, it seemed that upon disassembly, the teaser Spring was often broke (but not effecting clutch function). I usually dont like to deviate from stock (and I prefer OEM parts, too) but I'm not happy about pulling the motor to fix this 5 dollar problem....my grass is 10 inches tall. ☹
I can say this was the first time I worked on a Cub (any Cub) and learned a lot, and am VERY impressed with the way they were made back then, and just enjoyed the wrenchin'. Want to pull it all apart now, this winter.
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  #5  
Old 10-13-2021, 08:25 AM
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ironman ironman is offline
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Yes, the spacer does replace the teaser spring as shown in the photo below.
It is also suggested to put a 5/8" id lock washer between the pressure plates.
The washer will force the plates to separate and prevent them from rattling when the clutch is disengaged.
I have done this method a couple of times with no problems.
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File Type: jpg clutch1.jpg (24.3 KB, 72 views)
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  #6  
Old 10-13-2021, 08:51 AM
goonpeden goonpeden is offline
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I have run the set up like Ironman posted for over 20 years in my pulling tractors and never had a clutch failure! Replaced teaser spring with 5/8 ID pipe cut to be slightly longer than than cup. Also, good choice on going with the Kevlar disc. I ran aluminum disc for many years with no issues but Kevlar works great. I run this setup in a 16 HP and 20 HP V Twin.
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  #7  
Old 10-13-2021, 04:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironman View Post
Yes, the spacer does replace the teaser spring as shown in the photo below.
It is also suggested to put a 5/8" id lock washer between the pressure plates.
The washer will force the plates to separate and prevent them from rattling when the clutch is disengaged.
I have done this method a couple of times with no problems.
Information from miller's site????
I use extra caution using stuff-info from that site.
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Old 10-13-2021, 05:38 PM
Merk Merk is offline
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This info came from cub cadet parts lookup site:
https://www.cubcadet.com/en_US/conte...84f8cc1caebc/y

It doesn't show the spacer in the clutch assembly. The factory setup works great for 50 plus years with no problems. Something not set right if you are breaking teaser spring. You don't need pulling parts in and daily use tractor.
I've Been using this setup in a IH Cub Cadet 100 that has a 16 horse Kohler in it for 10 plus years. Tractor is mainly used for ground engaging work like pulling a modboard plow or a Cannon Earthcavator.
Here is link to clutch buildup in tech section: https://www.onlycubcadets.net/forum/...ad.php?t=54233
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  #9  
Old 10-15-2021, 08:37 PM
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I just rebuilt my clutch for my 73 a few months ago and put it back together with a new driveshaft, clutch disc, and teaser spring. I put it back together the way IH put it together in 1969. If it was good then and lasted till 2021 then I figured why fix what isn't broken (the design) with parts I don't need.
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  #10  
Old 10-16-2021, 11:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Merk View Post
Information from miller's site????
I use extra caution using stuff-info from that site.
The original poster asked for "info" about the alternative to using a spacer in lieu of a teaser spring.
Regardless of the origin, the illustration was shown to give clarity in response to his request.
Any reference to "individuals" or "sites" is your input, not mine.
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Cub Cadet is a premium line of outdoor power equipment, established in 1961 as part of International Harvester. During the 1960s, IH initiated an entirely new line of lawn and garden equipment aimed at the owners rural homes with large yards and private gardens. There were a wide variety of Cub Cadet branded and after-market attachments available; including mowers, blades, snow blowers, front loaders, plows, carts, etc. Cub Cadet advertising at that time harped on their thorough testing by "boys - acknowledged by many as the world's worst destructive force!". Cub Cadets became known for their dependability and rugged construction.

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