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  #31  
Old 01-10-2021, 11:40 AM
Ambush Ambush is online now
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Impact drivers were an essential tool for working on motorcycles in the old days. At least until you could afford to change out all the slot and Philips screws to Allen head. Still have two in the tool box that see active duty.
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  #32  
Old 01-10-2021, 01:39 PM
RustyShackleford RustyShackleford is offline
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Sorry guys, I should have specified - they’re all stripped at this point. The reason that there’s a Torx bit stuck in one of the set screw holes is that I attempted to remove that particular set screw by pounding a long Torx bit into the already-stripped screw and use that Torx bit to try to back it out.
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  #33  
Old 01-10-2021, 02:56 PM
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Like I said before, 3 jaw puller, you already removed the PTO button, you will not break the pulley, be aware when it breaks free the pulley will fly off.. so be careful.
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  #34  
Old 01-10-2021, 03:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambush View Post
Impact drivers were an essential tool for working on motorcycles in the old days. At least until you could afford to change out all the slot and Philips screws to Allen head. Still have two in the tool box that see active duty.
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  #35  
Old 01-10-2021, 03:56 PM
RustyShackleford RustyShackleford is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by darkminion_17 View Post
Like I said before, 3 jaw puller, you already removed the PTO button, you will not break the pulley, be aware when it breaks free the pulley will fly off.. so be careful.
My primary concern is not gouging the crank with the set screw on the bearing collar. If there isn’t too much risk of that, time to crank away on the puller
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  #36  
Old 01-10-2021, 04:35 PM
Ambush Ambush is online now
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The pulley will very likely pop off well before the bearing. Then you have access to the bearing set screw and lock collar. Get those off and put the puller on the bearing.
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  #37  
Old 01-10-2021, 07:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RustyShackleford View Post
My primary concern is not gouging the crank with the set screw on the bearing collar. If there isn’t too much risk of that, time to crank away on the puller
There is no set screws on the bearing collar. The collar locks the bearing onto crank by concentric cam action. The set screws tightens the PTO pulley against the bearing. With the puller, you are removing the PTO and the bearing that is locked into crank with the collar.
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  #38  
Old 01-11-2021, 01:56 PM
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The first set of Allen screws in the hole are tapered to a point. If everything is assembled correctly, the point of the screw actually decends behind the bearing. That is what keeps the pulley from sliding off the bearing. The second set of screws jam/lock the first set in place.
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  #39  
Old 01-13-2021, 08:48 AM
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All of the PTO's I've taken off have a set screw with a nut tightened on the concentrec collar that had to be removed before I could loosen the ring (clockways if I remember correctly). Ive had stuck stripped screws before, I just picked up a good set of cobalt drills and drilled it out. The key is slow speed, and lots of oil to keep the drill cool. I used thread cutting oil from the plumbing department of local hardware store. I took my time and didnt rush it and had it off in no time.

I did have to use a lenght of hard wood applied to back side of the pto to get it to seperate from the bearing. In the end the only danage was to the set screw that I pulled out using an easy out. one of the few times an easy out actually worked.
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