Only Cub Cadets

PLEASE PATRONIZE OUR SPONSORS!

CC Speciaalties R. F. Houtz and Sons

Patton Acres IH Cub Cadet Parts

Cub Cadet Parts & Service


If you would like to help maintain this site & enhance it, feel free to donate whatever amount you would like to!




Go Back   Only Cub Cadets > Cub Cadets > Tractor pullers using Cub Cadets!

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #41  
Old 08-24-2018, 05:05 PM
sorner's Avatar
sorner sorner is offline
Grand Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: PA
Posts: 1,262
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by olds45512 View Post
Before this great debate gets locked I'm gonna go ahead and say that it's nice to see coop and Jon on the same side for once.
ten characters
__________________
1912 with Haban 60" deck, Kohler M20 engine repower, CI rear, 50C deck, 364 snow blower

IH Cub Original with deck and snow blade
#2 cart
GREEN 314 with integral sleeve hitch, H2 and independent brake upgrade from a 317, and front hydraulic blade, 48" deck
Reply With Quote
  #42  
Old 01-10-2023, 08:23 AM
Club Cadet Club Cadet is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2022
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 22
Default

I do not have the answer to the original question but I think I understand what you are asking.

You would like to know how much to mill the heads to increase the compression ratio to the point where you have to run higher octane fuel to keep it from detonating (aka spark knock / aka pinging). As I understand it, this is usually a quick and inexpensive way to increase engine HP on water cooled engines like a small block V8. I don't think air cooled engines respond as well to this trick due to the limited cooling capacity of the air cooled engine design. Increasing the compression ratio increases ignition temperature. The valve in block design is also fighting you. Its design is also inefficient compared to an overhead valve engine like a small block V8. I think the flat head engine design responds better to increase air flow work of bigger cam/larger valves/ carb work/exhaust work than a bump in compression ratio.

You are also starting with a twin cylinder M18. These engines do not seem to be the choice for hot rodding. I'm not sure why - maybe because they already have 18HP and great torque from the twin cylinder design? Maybe they are too heavy in the wrong places for a pulling setup?
Reply With Quote
  #43  
Old 01-10-2023, 08:29 AM
Club Cadet Club Cadet is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2022
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 22
Default

My bad

After I posted I saw there were 5 pages to this thread and I'm just beating a dead horse
Reply With Quote
  #44  
Old 01-10-2023, 09:54 AM
1711Cub's Avatar
1711Cub 1711Cub is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2020
Location: Elkland, PA
Posts: 535
Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by Club Cadet View Post
I do not have the answer to the original question but I think I understand what you are asking.

You would like to know how much to mill the heads to increase the compression ratio to the point where you have to run higher octane fuel to keep it from detonating (aka spark knock / aka pinging). As I understand it, this is usually a quick and inexpensive way to increase engine HP on water cooled engines like a small block V8. I don't think air cooled engines respond as well to this trick due to the limited cooling capacity of the air cooled engine design. Increasing the compression ratio increases ignition temperature. The valve in block design is also fighting you. Its design is also inefficient compared to an overhead valve engine like a small block V8. I think the flat head engine design responds better to increase air flow work of bigger cam/larger valves/ carb work/exhaust work than a bump in compression ratio.

You are also starting with a twin cylinder M18. These engines do not seem to be the choice for hot rodding. I'm not sure why - maybe because they already have 18HP and great torque from the twin cylinder design? Maybe they are too heavy in the wrong places for a pulling setup?
While these are a great, proven engine, there is little to no factory or aftermarket support for them. They are thirsty, and the Command took over with more power and efficiency. The Command is still produced, so if tricking out a twin cylinder air cooled engine is your thing, that would be the way to go.
__________________

682, 782, 782D, 1282, 1050, 1210, 1711, and 1811
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:26 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, vBulletin Solutions Inc.

Cub Cadet is a premium line of outdoor power equipment, established in 1961 as part of International Harvester. During the 1960s, IH initiated an entirely new line of lawn and garden equipment aimed at the owners rural homes with large yards and private gardens. There were a wide variety of Cub Cadet branded and after-market attachments available; including mowers, blades, snow blowers, front loaders, plows, carts, etc. Cub Cadet advertising at that time harped on their thorough testing by "boys - acknowledged by many as the world's worst destructive force!". Cub Cadets became known for their dependability and rugged construction.

MTD Products, Inc. of Cleveland, Ohio purchased the Cub Cadet brand from International Harvester in 1981. Cub Cadet was held as a wholly owned subsidiary for many years following this acquisition, which allowed them to operate independently. Recently, MTD has taken a more aggressive role and integrated Cub Cadet into its other lines of power equipment.

This website and forum are not affiliated with or sponsored by MTD Products Inc, which owns the CUB CADET trademarks. It is not an official MTD Products Inc, website, and MTD Products Inc, is not responsible for any of its content. The official MTD Products Inc, website can be found at: http://www.mtdproducts.com. The information and opinions expressed on this website are the responsibility of the website's owner and/or it's members, and do not represent the opinions of MTD Products Inc. IH, INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER are registered trademark of CNH America LLC

All material, images, and graphics from this site are the property of www.onlycubcadets.net. Any unauthorized use, reproductions, or duplications are prohibited unless solely expressed in writing.

Cub Cadet, Cub, Cadet, IH, MTD, Parts, Tractors, Tractor, International Harvester, Lawn, Garden, Lawn Mower, Kohler, garden tractor equipment, lawn garden tractors, antique garden tractors, garden tractor, PTO, parts, online, Original, 70, 71, 72, 73, 76, SO76, 80, 81, 86, 100, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108,109, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 147, 149, 169, 182, 282, 382, 482, 580, 582, 582 Special, 680, 682, 782, 782D, 784, 800, 805, 882, 982, 984, 986, 1000, 1015, 1100, 1105, 1110, 1200, 1250, 1282, 1450, 1512, 1604, 1605, 1606, 1610, 1615, 1620, 1650, 1710, 1711, 1712, 1806, 1810, 1811, 1812, 1912, 1914.