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-   -   Cub Low Boy 154 Clutch Issue (https://www.onlycubcadets.net/forum/showthread.php?t=46135)

cgmiller 10-03-2016 05:22 PM

Cub Low Boy 154 Clutch Issue
 
Hello Folks,

I just picked up a sweet Cub Low Boy 154 Friday night. It has an issue with the clutch. It pops out of gear when in 1st or reverse unless the throttle is pushed way up. You cant get the tranny into gear unless the throttle is dropped way down (if that normal) and then unless you are holding the lever it pops out of gear immediately. Not an issue in 2nd or 3rd gear. I tried mowing a little Saturday afternoon (in the rain) before I put it in the barn and she did not seem to like going up hill in 2nd gear and would start to bog down..now this is my first time with an actual piece of machinery with a clutch and gears since I have a stick shift car 35 years ago. Thanks for the info~!o

Sam Mac 10-03-2016 06:59 PM

This is above my pay grade, time for Dr. J-Mech.:beerchug:

J-Mech 10-03-2016 07:11 PM

Hello Mr. Miller and welcome to the forum!

We do not have a section for the Lo-Boy tractors so we use the "General Talk" area. I moved your thread to the proper place.

As far as the trans popping out of gear, it likely has a worn shift fork on the 1st/rev slider. Either that or the edges are wore off the sliding gear because of the clutch issue. (See below.) It is also possible that the detent on the shift shaft is not working.... You will have to take the trans apart to fix it no matter which issue it is. Not a simple job.

The clutch on a 154 is on the front of the transmission. It does have a transmission brake. It's job is to stop the input shaft when the clutch pedal is depressed so that you can get it into gear quicker and without grinding. There is an adjustment procedure which is outlined in the service manual. All parts are available for the clutch.

The manual can be downloaded here:
http://service.mtdproducts.com/Train...-gss-1408.html

For parts, I suggest these guys:
http://hamiltonbobs.com/cart/search/...cub-lo-boy-mm4

Let me know if I can be any help. :beerchug:

cgmiller 10-03-2016 10:10 PM

John,

Thanks for the info. I reached out to Bob before I bought the tractor. I told him that he would be my new best friend for a bit. Either way it sounds like I should take her down the road to the local mechanic shop so that it gets fixed properly and I don't spend months trying to fix it.

Lanceskene 10-03-2016 11:43 PM

The tranny itself is pretty basic and easy enough to work on but its a good half days work just to split the tractor. I had a shift fork issue in my first 154 so Ive been there and fixed that but since then the rear pressure plate broke so that 154 is now a parts donor for my second 154. They are actually pretty simple basic machines to work on.

J-Mech 10-03-2016 11:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lanceskene (Post 394696)
The tranny itself is pretty basic and easy enough to work on but its a good half days work just to split the tractor. I had a shift fork issue in my first 154 so Ive been there and fixed that but since then the rear pressure plate broke so that 154 is now a parts donor for my second 154. They are actually pretty simple basic machines to work on.

Lance, I agree with you. They are simple..... but they are much larger than a garden tractor. If you don't have a decent garage with a fairly large jack, jack stands, and some kind of a crane or splitting stand.... It's just a bit more than the average do-it-yourselfer has at home to work with. It's not the complexity so much as the size. :beerchug:

I can split a 100HP tractor in a couple hours. I'd honestly rather do that than split a Lo-Boy.:biggrin2: They just aren't as "friendly" to work on.

Lanceskene 10-04-2016 12:41 AM

Oh ya I wasnt suggesting its a job everyone can, or should do, but I think if people want to own antique tractors and actually use them they should try and learn how to work on them, and in this case it is a 'fairly' simple job once you get all the body work and wheels out of the way... which as you mentioned does require some equipment that the OP may or may not have access to.

J-Mech 10-04-2016 01:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lanceskene (Post 394703)
Oh ya I wasnt suggesting its a job everyone can, or should do, but I think if people want to own antique tractors and actually use them they should try and learn how to work on them, and in this case it is a 'fairly' simple job once you get all the body work and wheels out of the way... which as you mentioned does require some equipment that the OP may or may not have access to.

:IH Trusted Hand:

cgmiller 10-04-2016 01:25 PM

This kind of intel is exactly why I asked the question of the "experts". I am all for doing things myself, but I have limits and one big one is time. I have been acquiring better (and bigger) tools such as floor jacks and chain hoists but my biggest challenge is time. I get to my place every other weekend and the time just flys by. I have been working on the house, cutting the grass, playing in the woods, hunting season is here, etc. .. I watched a video of a teenage girl replacing the clutch in an older Farmall Cub. She did it in 15 minutes while wearing a white outfit and did not even get dirty..I would have spent all day and got covered in grease...she is amazing. But she was in a large garage with all kinds of tools and equipment..plus she knew exactly what to do and had help from her mother. I am usually there alone with no helpers. Sounds like I need to take her to the local garage for this job after I cut the grass one last time. Thanks again!

darryljs 10-05-2016 09:11 PM

Why would you have to split a 154 to replace gears or shift forks. I replaced gears , complete clutch and drive shaft without splitting. Didn't have any trouble doing it without splitting.


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