Only Cub Cadets

PLEASE PATRONIZE OUR SPONSORS!

Cub Cadet Classics R. F. Houtz and Sons

Patton Acres Binder Books

IH Cub Cadet Parts


If you would like to help maintain this site & enhance it, feel free to donate whatever amount you would like to!



Only Cub Cadets Chat!

OCC Archives


Go Back   Only Cub Cadets > Cub Cadets > IH Cub Cadet Tractors (GT)

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old 12-08-2017, 07:53 PM
twoton twoton is offline
Grand Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: MA
Posts: 1,273
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by CUBRAT View Post
....... also took the ball out of the tranny input flange and mounted the drive shaft solid as well.....
Quote:
Originally Posted by CUBRAT View Post
..... and will solid mount the rear coupler using 3/8" nuts.....
I think itís worth considering the importance of maintaining a certain level of alignment along the center line of the crankshaft, the driveshaft and the transmission input shaft. Iím guessing that the International engineers that designed these machines sought to absorb any mis alignment and therefor reduce vibration with the ball bushings and the rag joint. You might want to re consider solid mounting the rear of the driveshaft.
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 12-08-2017, 09:32 PM
CUBRAT CUBRAT is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Missouri
Posts: 16
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by twoton View Post
I think it’s worth considering the importance of maintaining a certain level of alignment along the center line of the crankshaft, the driveshaft and the transmission input shaft. I’m guessing that the International engineers that designed these machines sought to absorb any mis alignment and therefor reduce vibration with the ball bushings and the rag joint. You might want to re consider solid mounting the rear of the driveshaft.
Here is the instruction I recieved on solid mounting the rear coupler:

"Flex Coupler Arms Fastened TogetherWith solid motor mounts installed in a Cub Cadet that originally came with an ISO-mounted engine, the driveshaft will not be able to "move" with the engine and there'll be less chance of clutch parts prematurely wearing or breaking. The flexible rubber disc(s) at the end of the driveshaft will be useless too, and could deteriorate over time. So instead of replacing the OEM coupler arms with a machined rigid tubular coupler, make the coupler arms rigid by removing the flexible rubber disc(s) and install a couple of 3/8" thickness spacers for a single disc, and a couple of 3/4" thickness spacers for double discs, and then fasten the arms together with a couple of 3/8" diameter hardened steel bolts. (Large nuts are used as spacers in the picture to the right.) By the way - one rubber flex disc is 3/8" thick. This setup is just as strong as using a rigid tubular coupler, and it cost a lot less."

Anyone have any other opinions on this? Im all ears
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 12-08-2017, 09:53 PM
mortten mortten is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Ohio
Posts: 560
Default

Brian Miller I'd kind of banned around here.
__________________
Doug

Dad's 122 w/42" cast deck
1250 w/hydraulic lift and 50C deck converted to an A
QA-36A
42" blade
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 12-08-2017, 10:05 PM
CUBRAT CUBRAT is offline
New Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: Missouri
Posts: 16
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mortten View Post
Brian Miller I'd kind of banned around here.
I understand why now. His name, nor link is mentioned.

Not trying to cause problems, just seeking advice

I would like opinions on mounting the rear flange from experienced person's.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 12-08-2017, 11:00 PM
sawdustdad's Avatar
sawdustdad sawdustdad is offline
Grand Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: VA
Posts: 1,838
Default

No harm in keeping the flex disc connection, regardless of how the motor is mounted. Having a flex disc in the drive line provides some forgiveness in alignment and should reduce vibration and stress on bearings, etc.
__________________


149-3pt, weights; 72-fenders & 3pt; 123; 148R-creeper, 3pt, spring assist, weights; 128 with rear PTO, 109, 1000-creeper, 3pt, weights; 108-creeper, 3pt & spring assist; 1250; 1450 w/weights; 1650-3pt and weights; 8 mower decks, (4)42 & (1)54 inch blades, QA42A Snow thrower, #1 Tiller w/exts, #1 cart, and a cultivator.
Ford 2000; Kubota BX23--Frank
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 12-09-2017, 10:02 AM
ironman's Avatar
ironman ironman is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 509
Default

I am assuming you are still using the original rear coupler that goes on the transmission input shaft, correct? So if that is the case, then it has the centering bearing. So as long as that centering bearing is not shot or worn out, it should center your driveshaft with the center of your transmission input shaft regardless of whether there is a ball in there or not.

With that being said, I personally would NOT replace the rubber flex coupler with metal spacers because there is no way on God's Green Earth that you can tell if there is a direct straight line all the way through the crankshaft and through the transmission input shaft. Making it solid is an invitation for disaster unless it was originally engineered that way such as the older Cubs.

However if it were me, I WOULD use TWO rubber flex couplers instead of one. Just make sure the end of your driveshaft is getting into the the centering bearing in the rear coupler. Just my
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:17 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Cub Cadet is a premium line of outdoor power equipment, established in 1961 as part of International Harvester. During the 1960s, IH initiated an entirely new line of lawn and garden equipment aimed at the owners rural homes with large yards and private gardens. There were a wide variety of Cub Cadet branded and after-market attachments available; including mowers, blades, snow blowers, front loaders, plows, carts, etc. Cub Cadet advertising at that time harped on their thorough testing by "boys - acknowledged by many as the world's worst destructive force!". Cub Cadets became known for their dependability and rugged construction.

MTD Products, Inc. of Cleveland, Ohio purchased the Cub Cadet brand from International Harvester in 1981. Cub Cadet was held as a wholly owned subsidiary for many years following this acquisition, which allowed them to operate independently. Recently, MTD has taken a more aggressive role and integrated Cub Cadet into its other lines of power equipment.

This website and forum are not affiliated with or sponsored by MTD Products Inc, which owns the CUB CADET trademarks. It is not an official MTD Products Inc, website, and MTD Products Inc, is not responsible for any of its content. The official MTD Products Inc, website can be found at: http://www.mtdproducts.com. The information and opinions expressed on this website are the responsibility of the website's owner and/or it's members, & do not represent the opinions of MTD Products Inc. IHģ, INTERNATIONAL HARVESTERģ are registered trademark of CNH America LLC

All material, images, and graphics from this site are the property of www.onlycubcadets.net. Any unauthorized use, reproductions, or duplications are prohibited unless solely expressed in writing.

Cub Cadet, Cub, Cadet, IH, MTD, Parts, Tractors, Tractor, International Harvester, Lawn, Garden, Lawn Mower, Kohler, garden tractor equipment, lawn garden tractors, antique garden tractors, garden tractor, PTO, parts, online, Original, 70, 71, 72, 73, 76, SO76, 80, 81, 86, 100, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108,109, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 147, 149, 169, 182, 282, 382, 482, 580, 582, 582 Special, 680, 682, 782, 782D, 784, 800, 805, 882, 982, 984, 986, 1000, 1015, 1100, 1105, 1110, 1200, 1250, 1282, 1450, 1512, 1604, 1605, 1606, 1610, 1615, 1620, 1650, 1710, 1711, 1712, 1806, 1810, 1811, 1812, 1912, 1914.