Only Cub Cadets

PLEASE PATRONIZE OUR SPONSORS!

Cub Cadet Classics R. F. Houtz and Sons

Patton Acres Binder Books

CC Speciaalties IH Cub Cadet Parts

Cub Cadet Parts & Service


If you would like to help maintain this site & enhance it, feel free to donate whatever amount you would like to!



Only Cub Cadets Chat!

OCC Archives


Go Back   Only Cub Cadets > Off Topic > The Tool Shed

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-09-2018, 09:18 AM
twoton twoton is online now
Grand Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: MA
Posts: 1,625
Default Spark Plug Cleaners

Looking for opinions on abrasive/pneumatic spark plug cleaners. I've had one for years and use it regularly. Always clean the plugs well with brake cleaner and or compressed air after blasting to remove any grit before installation.

https://www.amazon.com/Pneumatic-Spa...k+plug+cleaner

During mowing season I tend to clean spark plug, swap out air filter (K&N), change crankcase oil if needed, sharpen blades etc.. etc..., on a fairly regular basis. New plug every year or so as needed.

Curious what the rest of you'all think...
Attached Images
File Type: jpg plug cleaner.jpg (26.2 KB, 64 views)
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-09-2018, 10:51 AM
J-Mech's Avatar
J-Mech J-Mech is online now
Grand Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Oblong, Illinois
Posts: 16,544
Default

I own somewhere in the neighborhood of $80,000 worth of tools and equipment. Only thing I own for cleaning a spark plug is a wire brush.

I'm assuming you mow with your QL tractor. Kohler manual suggests changing oil every 25 hours. I really think that is too often, even on a splash lube motor, given the quality of oil we have now. No need to do it anymore often than that.

If you are pulling the spark plug and changing oil even once mid season mowing, you should stop. It doesn't need done that often. I was telling a guy on here the other day, you should get at least 100-150 hours out of spark plug. I can't even remember the last time I pulled a plug out of any of my tractors. They run great. You are going to wear the threads out of the aluminum head. There's no reason to own a $25 machine to clean a $3 plug. It will actually decrease their life, not extend it. Put it in and run it. Pull it once a year if you must. Check it, gap it, wire brush it and put it back in and leave it. If you are fouling plugs or they get dirty mid season, you have other issues that need addressed.


I also strongly suggest not using a K&N air filter on your tractor if that is what you are saying you run. Too dirty an atmosphere to use a filter like that. It will plug up very fast. I have nothing against K&N (oil charged) filters. I don't think there is a better way to filter air than with oil.... that's actually proven. But in order to do it (on a tractor) and not need to clean and recharge the filter all the time is if you add an air filter housing with a centrifuge cap and maybe an asperator tube to help draw the dirt out of the cap.... maybe. A dry filter is best unless you change the housing.
__________________
Jonathan
"They say money doesn't buy happiness....... but it does buy Cub Cadets, and Cub Cadets make me VERY happy!"

Runners: 1050, 1811, 185LB, JD 317
On the "back burner": 2-71's, 1250DS, 1000, 582, 682, 982, JD 318.
I have over 30 implements/attachments! IH, Cub Cadet, Brinly, Agrifab, and more!
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-09-2018, 11:04 AM
twoton twoton is online now
Grand Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: MA
Posts: 1,625
Default

Jonathan, I appreciate your advice and respect your opinion, thanks for commenting.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-09-2018, 02:46 PM
cooperino cooperino is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: New York
Posts: 269
Default

Know that machine well.. They use to be in every auto shop in the 70's and 80's. Got one hanging around somewhere with a few inches of dust on it probably next to my old Sun 800 motor tester lol. Relics really. We got a Snap on Zeus not long ago.. $9500 bucks just to keep current with the late model trucks we get in here. It was a little cheaper than some because we didn't need a Asian adapters and such. I wonder how that plug cleaner would work on todays iridium plugs LOL.. kidding
__________________
Cooperino 126,129,804,1211
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-09-2018, 04:17 PM
twoton twoton is online now
Grand Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: MA
Posts: 1,625
Default

Yeah, the Sun Engine analyzer, remember when those were top of the line?

Thanks for commenting Cooperino.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-09-2018, 04:43 PM
cooperino cooperino is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: New York
Posts: 269
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by twoton View Post
Yeah, the Sun Engine analyzer, remember when those were top of the line?

Thanks for commenting Cooperino.

I don't remember when they were tippy top lol Not that old.. But I used them for many many years before OBDI.. Remember counting the flashes ?? UUgh. what a nightmare. Then in 96 OBDII wreaked some havoc until everyone got up to speed. I really really liked the simpler days tho. Maybe why I am attracted to old trucks, cars and tractors. When new ford 4.9's became impossible to get the TUG manufacturers tried Ford 4.2 liter fuel injected engines for awhile. Horrible engine especially in industrial use, but the real problem was the older GSE techs had very little knowledge of fuel injection let alone ECM's. Luckily the engines were so horrible the manufactures stopped using them within a couple years and went to OEM spec new 4.9's again. Since then they stopped messing around and now produce primarily tugs with Cummins 4 cylinders, Deutz, or Perkins engines. Now i feel sorry for the older guys still wrenchin in mom and pop shops with the self driving, self braking systems coming out. Will be a couple years before the warranty is out and people start bringing these to small auto shops but when it happens it will be difficult for them.
__________________
Cooperino 126,129,804,1211
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-09-2018, 05:13 PM
twoton twoton is online now
Grand Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: MA
Posts: 1,625
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cooperino View Post
......blah, blah blah, Ford , blah, blah blah, lots of words,....
First truck I ever bought was a ’76 F250 with a 360, 4 speed and 4.10 gears. When I was just checking it out I took it down to see my ol’ buddy Jerry at the Shell station. Said "hey Jerry", I said, put this b!tch on the Sun machine an’ tell me what chu think. Jerry says, "Listen Dick, I’ll tell ya what I think, this POS truck is only running on 5 cylinders. You better tell me the name of the guy that’s trying to rip you off so I can tell him a thing or two". Well, knowing Jerry I decided to go to plan B and run the motha up the biggest hill I could find in Worcesta with the pedal through the floor in 3rd gear. Bought that truck.

Nice thing about that truck was I never had to change the oil, just add! Course I cleaned the spark plugs every week and swapped out the K&N just as often…

Still got that truck.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06-09-2018, 05:43 PM
cooperino cooperino is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: New York
Posts: 269
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by twoton View Post
First truck I ever bought was a ’76 F250 with a 360, 4 speed and 4.10 gears. When I was just checking it out I took it down to see my ol’ buddy Jerry at the Shell station. Said hey Jerry, put this b!tch on the Sun machine an’ tell me what chu think. Jerry says I’ll tell ya what I think, this POS truck is only running on 5 cylinders. You better tell me the name of the guy that’s trying to rip you off so I can tell him a thing or two. Well, knowing Jerry I decided to go to plan B and run the motha up the biggest hill I could find in Worcesta with the pedal through the floor in 3rd gear. Bought that truck.

Nice thing about that truck was I never had to change the oil, just add! Course I cleaned the spark plugs every week and swapped out the K&N just as often…

Still got that truck.
OK lol. well then ya must remember whammies! Or at least thats what we called them here.. Non foulers. You could buy them as anti foul plugs or as adapters that you put on the end of the plug before you installed it. For engines that ya just didnt want to rebuild but you wanted to keep running it without changing or cleaning plugs once a week.
__________________
Cooperino 126,129,804,1211
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 06-09-2018, 09:35 PM
john hall's Avatar
john hall john hall is offline
Grand Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Durham, NC
Posts: 2,597
Default

I never really clean plugs unless its something that has been sitting a while with old fuel and I have managed to flood it, then I just dry them off, maybe rotate them out with another used one--but again this is something I rarely do. I do, however, keep lots of new plugs in stock. Napa is the cheapest around here, I get discount codes emailed to me so I just order online and pick up in the store. We have several old gas powered pcs of farm equipment. Generally just run them till they start acting up, then tune up ignition system as needed.
__________________
2072 w/60" Haban
982 with 3 pt and 60" Haban
1811 with ags and 50C
124 w/hydraulic lift
782 w/mounted sprayer
2284 w/54" mowing deck
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 06-10-2018, 09:02 AM
twoton twoton is online now
Grand Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: MA
Posts: 1,625
Default

Thanks john hall, I appreciate your opinion, and thanks for commenting.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:32 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Cub Cadet is a premium line of outdoor power equipment, established in 1961 as part of International Harvester. During the 1960s, IH initiated an entirely new line of lawn and garden equipment aimed at the owners rural homes with large yards and private gardens. There were a wide variety of Cub Cadet branded and after-market attachments available; including mowers, blades, snow blowers, front loaders, plows, carts, etc. Cub Cadet advertising at that time harped on their thorough testing by "boys - acknowledged by many as the world's worst destructive force!". Cub Cadets became known for their dependability and rugged construction.

MTD Products, Inc. of Cleveland, Ohio purchased the Cub Cadet brand from International Harvester in 1981. Cub Cadet was held as a wholly owned subsidiary for many years following this acquisition, which allowed them to operate independently. Recently, MTD has taken a more aggressive role and integrated Cub Cadet into its other lines of power equipment.

This website and forum are not affiliated with or sponsored by MTD Products Inc, which owns the CUB CADET trademarks. It is not an official MTD Products Inc, website, and MTD Products Inc, is not responsible for any of its content. The official MTD Products Inc, website can be found at: http://www.mtdproducts.com. The information and opinions expressed on this website are the responsibility of the website's owner and/or it's members, & do not represent the opinions of MTD Products Inc. IH®, INTERNATIONAL HARVESTER® are registered trademark of CNH America LLC

All material, images, and graphics from this site are the property of www.onlycubcadets.net. Any unauthorized use, reproductions, or duplications are prohibited unless solely expressed in writing.

Cub Cadet, Cub, Cadet, IH, MTD, Parts, Tractors, Tractor, International Harvester, Lawn, Garden, Lawn Mower, Kohler, garden tractor equipment, lawn garden tractors, antique garden tractors, garden tractor, PTO, parts, online, Original, 70, 71, 72, 73, 76, SO76, 80, 81, 86, 100, 102, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108,109, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 147, 149, 169, 182, 282, 382, 482, 580, 582, 582 Special, 680, 682, 782, 782D, 784, 800, 805, 882, 982, 984, 986, 1000, 1015, 1100, 1105, 1110, 1200, 1250, 1282, 1450, 1512, 1604, 1605, 1606, 1610, 1615, 1620, 1650, 1710, 1711, 1712, 1806, 1810, 1811, 1812, 1912, 1914.